Falling for ‘Her’

The beautiful, dark and intriguing world of Her is a signal that the exploration of artificial intelligence, voice and natural language technologies – creating avatars whom understand, listen and decipher what we say – is something that is being talked about in a very real, very big way. Reinventing the relationship between people and technology may seem ambitious but Nuance believes that there is a way for us to engage with our devices on our own terms.
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Her pic

“When we talk of emotion, there are certain things in a conversation that are indicative,” said Gary Clayton, the chief creative officer at the intelligent-systems company Nuance… Sometimes it’s an earnest “uh-huh” or a hesitant pause. “What is the voice like? What is the tone like? What kinds of words do they use?” he said. “All of these aspects of an interaction either implicitly or explicitly form an impression.”

– Betsy Morais,

The New Yorker, “Can Humans Fall in Love with Bots?”

Spike Jonze’s latest work, the science fiction film, Her, which is about a man (played by actor, Joaquin Phoenix) who develops a relationship with a female voice produced by a computer operating system (played by actor, Scarlett Johansson), is  launching in the US on December 18th, 2013.

In advance of the film’s upcoming debut (worldwide – January 2014), Betsy Morais of The New Yorker wrote an article exploring the role of voice and artificial intelligence in realizing the potential for emotional connections between man and machine.

Jonze’s work showcases exactly the type of reality Nuance is enabling – as we speak. Technology that once felt far-fetched – the stuff of science fiction – is quickly becoming our own personal Spike Jonze movie.

Okay, maybe we’re not that cool.

But, the reality is: the beautiful, dark and intriguing world of Her is a signal that the exploration of artificial intelligence, voice and natural language technologies – creating avatars whom understand, listen and decipher what we say – is something that is being talked about in a very real, very big way.

Reinventing the relationship between people and technology may seem ambitious but Nuance believes that there is a way for us to engage with our devices on our own terms.

Imagine an operating system that delivers on the reality of intelligent personal assistants that hear you, understand you, know your likes and preferences – and exist across phones, cars, PCs and TVs. Cool? Romantic? Impossible? If you’re Nuance, the idea is not only brilliant – it’s our focus and drive as we reinvent the relationship between people and technology. It is the chance to connect with your devices on human terms and presents infinite possibilities for intuitive interfaces that adapt to you.

Now, let’s start the conversation.

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Gary Clayton

About Gary Clayton

As Chief Creative Officer for Nuance Communications, Gary Clayton holds a unique role that sits at the intersection of strategy, innovation and design. Spanning the mobile, healthcare, consumer and enterprise markets, Gary drives an innovative team of engineers and creative designers that interpret technology trends through a design lens and attempt to create next-generation user experiences. Prior to joining Nuance, Gary was the vice president of speech strategy for Yahoo!, where he led the Company's efforts in creating next-generation speech applications including speech-enabled, unconstricted web search. Before Yahoo!, he was the Chief Creative Officer for Tellme Networks, a division of Microsoft where he oversaw many applications including Tellme Search. Prior to Tellme Gary was the founder and president of Clayton Multimedia. Gary holds five US patents and applications, is a Grammy Award nominee, and his innovations have been acclaimed by a number of associations and journals, including the Wall Street Journal Innovation Awards.