What’s next:
Corporate

×

Resilience: hardwired in our DNA

The lessons we learn from living through a difficult experience remain with us. They make us stronger and better prepared when new challenges arise. These new challenges may not be easier, but with hardwired resilience we can approach them with greater wisdom and perspective.

By
resilience hardwired in our DNA

Medical professionals know better than anyone the qualities it takes to face unexpected challenges head on. They see it every day in patients who are faced with difficult diagnoses and treatments. They see the courage and strength in their patients who respond to adversity with a willingness to keep fighting, even when it’s hard. There is a word for the type of grit it takes to look positively toward the future under difficult circumstances: resilience.

This resilience doesn’t disappear when treatment is completed. It becomes hardwired in one’s DNA.

The lessons we learn from living through a difficult experience remain with us. They make us stronger and better prepared when new challenges arise. These new challenges may not be easier, but with hardwired resilience we can approach them with greater wisdom and perspective.

Certainly, all challenges are not created equal. And while we cannot compare the challenges of life-threatening disease to the malware incident Nuance experienced on June 27, this incident represented a significant challenge.  It drew upon our personal and professional grit, and it has made us more resilient.  Similarly, as medical professionals bond to their patients, this incident bonded us to our clients.

Our highest priority throughout the incident was – and always is – the well-being of our clients.

Faced with this unexpected challenge, we moved quickly to restore our systems and get our clients back on-line, as soon as possible—and we hardened our systems to prepare for future threats.

Bringing our systems back on-line required partnership and trust. Our restoration process was a two-way street—we trusted our experts to ensure that we were safeguarded against future attacks, and our clients continued to place their trust in us and our products to help them serve their patients.

Going forward, no one can predict what threats may come, but we are ready to face them with the lessons we learned from this experience.

Challenges aren’t something you ask for or wish upon anyone. Yet, through hardship we all can solve problems we cannot predict—in ways we couldn’t have imagined. Despite undesirable circumstances, we continue to grow and learn in ways that prepare us for whatever may come.

Overall, the challenge we faced with this incident serves as a reminder of the courage and resilience of our clients’ and their patients. Our clients’ dedication to their patients’ well-being is unsurpassed, and we are honored to continue to innovate for and with them, so they may fulfill their mission.

Follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter to learn more.

Read full article

More from the editor

The value of relationships
Thank You. Beyond Words.
Malware: Knowledge is power
Based on research and work of independent experts, we are putting knowledge into action.
Separating malware facts from fiction
A computer malware program is often called a virus for a reason
Common security questions, June 27 malware incident
Answers to top customer questions
Company Update on Malware Incident
Statement for July 5, 2017
Nuance Healthcare value of relationships
The value of relationships
Thank You. Beyond Words.
Nuance answers common customer questions about the June 27 malware incident
Common security questions, June 27 malware incident
Answers to top customer questions
Satish Maripuri explains the malware incident that affected Nuance
Malware: Knowledge is power
Based on research and work of independent experts, we are putting knowledge into action.
company update
Company Update on Malware Incident
Statement for July 5, 2017
Satish Maripuri explains the malware incident that affected Nuance
Separating malware facts from fiction
A computer malware program is often called a virus for a reason
Show more articles