Celebrating change: Is it time to revolutionize your call center?

Nuance’s work with many of the world’s largest companies provides us with a unique vantage point into what makes a quality customer service experience in the IVR. Here’s a checklist of eight capabilities crucial to offering a leading customer experience.
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We celebrate all kinds of decisions countries make on behalf of their citizens – to stay or go, or start a revolution – but companies should be evaluating and constantly making decisions that better their customer service as well.

Countries are constantly evaluating the level and value of the service they provide to their citizens. Earlier this week in the U.S., we celebrated the country’s decision to declare its independence from Great Britain 240 years ago. More recently, Britain made a decision of its own to leave the European Union. While every situation is different, countries often make decisions to change course after evaluating their options. And companies should adopt the same considerations when evaluating the service they provide those they are designed to serve: their customers.

Nuance’s work with many of the world’s largest companies provides us with a unique vantage point into what makes a quality customer service experience in the IVR. As such, we’ve identified eight capabilities crucial to offering a leading customer experience. Use this checklist to determine where your company falls on the path to IVR modernization, and if you need to make any adjustments to better serve your customers.

  1. IVR type – Is your system DTMF or speech-enabled? Does this provide the best experience for callers? Technologies have come a long way and natural language-based systems can provide enhanced experiences.
  1. Audio quality – Test your IVR for sound clarity, feel, and concatenation. Concatenation? Yes, concatenation! If the speech volume is too low or the words don’t flow and link together well in a cohesive sentence (concatenation) the caller experience will be poor.
  1. Speech recognition accuracy – A good IVR understands the words you are saying. It recognizes words, speech patterns, dialects, and different languages. ¿Su IVR entiende español?
  1. Caller intent – Does your IVR know what someone is trying to accomplish? Can it determine why they called? Getting caller intent wrong increases misroutes and customer dissatisfaction.
  1. Conversational dialogue – People respond better when engaging with a system in a natural, conversational tone. Would your IVR benefit from an upgrade to natural language technology?
  1. Personalization – You have tons of customer data. But are you using it to maximum advantage to speed up caller identification and reduce handle time? The possibilities nowadays are endless.
  1. Speed – How long does it take a caller to get through your IVR? How many steps does it take for the caller to reach their goal and find a resolution for their problem or receive an answer to a question? Call your IVR to see if you are happy with the duration.
  1. Ease of use – Customers reward companies who make life easier for them. Simplify your IVR and you’ll boost customer satisfaction and your bottom line!

With these eight criteria you’ll be able to re-examine your current IVR and decide if it’s best to stay the course or enact change to create a better world for your customers and your business.

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Mastering call routing

Call misroutes are the single largest source of wasted contact center resources and customer frustration. With the 5 strategies outlined in this guide, you can predictably and reliably reduce misroutes by 5% - 15%.

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Chris Caile

About Chris Caile

Chris Caile joined Nuance in September 2015 as senior solutions marketing manager for Nuance Conversational IVR (Interactive Voice Response). Before joining Nuance, Caile worked in various marketing and sales support positions at Microsoft and Motorola and has over 20 years of experience in the high tech industry. Caile holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Illinois State University with minors in mathematics and economics.