Who really has the antibodies to healthcare tech adoption?

According to a recent survey, the majority of physicians stated they would prefer to be involved in health technology selection and adoption.
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A lot has been written about physician resistance to tech adoption, but is this true?  According to a recent survey, 88 percent of physicians said they would give their time, seeing fewer patients and making less money for a period of six to nine months, to “become deeply involved in a clinical documentation technology implementation.”

With the ICD-10 transition nine months away, clinical documentation improvement has become imperative to ensuring accuracy, providing quality care to patients, and protecting revenue cycles.  But the technology being implemented needs to work for physicians, not add to their already overburdened schedules.  So, when 98 percent of physicians surveyed say they find post-discharge coding queries disruptive to their workflows, it becomes evident that something needs to change.  It’s time we start taking notes on what our clinicians’ are telling us, involve them in the technology decisions that impact them, and devise and implement intuitive workflows that fit their daily routines.

Check out the “Physician Attitudes Toward Clinical Documentation Technology & Processes” survey and hear what physicians are telling us:

To learn more about the solutions that are helping to ease the administrative burden placed physicians, stop by the Nuance booth #3765 at HIMSS, February 24 – 27.

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Dr. Nick van Terheyden

About Dr. Nick van Terheyden

Nick is Chief Medical Information Officer for Nuance where he focuses on improving the usability of health technology for both providers and patients. As a pioneering creator in the evolution of healthcare technology, he brings a distinctive blend of medical practitioner and business strategist to the realm of health IT. After several years as a medical practitioner in London and Australia, he joined an international who's who in healthcare, academia and business, in the development of the first electronic medical record in the early 1990's and later, as a business leader in one of the first speech recognition Internet companies. Nick attended the Royal Free Hospital School of Medicine, at the University of London. He is a certified football (soccer) coach and referee as well as a purveyor of fine Scottish Malt whisky.