The force of digitizing paper

As organizations around the globe look to achieve improved efficiencies, many recognize that the digitization of paper ranks high on the priority scale. While there are a number of comforts associated with paper, in reality, it is inherently inefficient.
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As organizations around the globe look to achieve improved efficiencies, many recognize that the digitization of paper ranks high on the priority scale. While there are a number of comforts associated with paper, in reality, it is inherently inefficient.

For example, it is time-consuming to physically look through file cabinets, boxes, and folders. Distribution of documents is another challenge requiring copying time, expensive postal costs, overnight carrier costs, and inefficient – often insecure – fax transmissions. The editing of paper documents is also not effective as they must be retyped and paper form completion takes a lot of additional time. Finally, paper is prone to disasters, both big and small, as it is only redundant when it is copied.

For all of these reasons, the trend has become abundantly clear. First, wherever possible, digitize, and second, if paper is part of an existing business process, it should be digitized as quickly and efficiently as possible. To accommodate these needs, users are now scanning papers to their desktops (on-demand) using multi-function printers (MFPs) for centralized scanning and in rare circumstances, relying upon production-grade scanning stations.

If you are not familiar with the “nuances” of digitizing or scanning paper, it is important to point out that going through the actual scanning process represents only half the battle. The other half is introduced when users attempt to convert the scanned “picture” of the document into a rich and meaningful format.

Scanned documents come to life and present an entirely new level of value if the document image can be converted to searchable and formative text. To accomplish this, the right tools are needed to enliven a scanned picture of the document into a meaningful document asset.

Digitizing paper may provide more benefits that you might think. According to recent research from PricewaterhouseCoopers:

  • Companies spend $20 in labor to file a document, $120 in labor to find a misfiled document, and $220 in labor to reproduce a lost document
  • Of all the pages that get handled each day in the average office, 90% are merely shuffled
  • The average document gets copied 19 times
  • 7.5 percent of all documents get lost, 3 more percent get misfiled

Interested in learning more about the benefits of digitizing your content? Nuance document workflow and automation tools deliver measurable productivity gains and cost reduction by streamlining the ways people create, share, store, and use office documents.

To learn more, quantify the benefits of deploying Nuance’s print management and document scanning and conversion solutions in your organization. 

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Jeff Segarra

About Jeff Segarra

Jeff Segarra is the Senior Director of Product Marketing for the Nuance Document Imaging Division. He is responsible for the global team that delivers industry product positioning, messaging and content to help our customers around the world identify how Nuance solutions can meet their needs. He enjoys speaking and writing about business process improvement, The Internet of Things, document security, document conversion technologies and personal productivity. He has an MBA from Iona College, Hagan School of Business and has been working with software technology for 20 years. Jeff is an original New Yorker and, therefore, a staunch Yankees fan – in the heart of Red Sox nation.